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2016 Los Angeles Clippers Gameday 1

GLENN “DOC” RIVERS PRESIDENT OF BASKETBALL OPERATIONS AND HEAD COACH Glenn “Doc” Rivers enters his fourth season in Los Angeles as the Clippers President of Basketball Operations and Head Coach. In his 17th season as an NBA head coach, Rivers led the team to a 53-29 (.646) record in 2015-16 and the fourth-seed in the NBA Playoffs. The NBA Coach of the Month for January 2016 and April 2016, Rivers recorded his 750th career coaching victory on April 6, 2016 in the Clippers 91-81 win over the Los Angeles Lakers. Rivers is just the 16th coach in NBA history to win at least 750 games and is one of only two active head coaches (Gregg Popovich) to do so. The 1999-2000 NBA Coach of the Year, Rivers is one of six active NBA head coaches to win an NBA title and owns a lifetime 753-553 (.577) regular season coaching record and a 79-75 (.513) career Playoff record. As Clippers President of Basketball Operations, Rivers was instrumental in assembling a talented roster for the 2016-17 season by adding depth to an already strong core. Rivers re-signed key free agents including threetime Sixth Man of the Year Jamal Crawford, Wes Johnson, Luc Mbah a Moute and Austin Rivers. In addition, Rivers and the Clippers signed free agent guard/forward Alan Anderson, forward Brandon Bass, guard Raymond Felton and center Marreese Speights. The team also added two players to the roster from the 2016 NBA Draft including first round pick forward Brice Johnson (25th) and center Diamond Stone (40th). A former Clippers point guard (1991-92), Rivers became the 16th head coach in Clippers history (1984-Present) in June, 2013 after the Boston Celtics agreed to release him from his contract in exchange for a first round pick in the 2015 NBA Draft as compensation. In his first season in L.A., Rivers led the team to the best record in franchise history (57-25, .695) and helped guide the Clippers to the Western Conference Semifinals. Rivers became the Clippers President of Basketball Operations on June 16, 2014 after directing them to the 2013-14 Pacific Division title while also establishing a new franchise record for the most home wins in a single season. Before joining the Clippers, Rivers spent nine seasons with the Celtics, compiling a 416-305 (.576) record and leading the Celtics to the 2007- 08 NBA Championship with an NBA-best 66-16 regular season record. Rivers led the Celtics to six Atlantic Division titles, the 2009-10 Eastern Conference Championship and a 59-47 (.556) Playoff record. During the course of the 2007-08 campaign with the Celtics, he received NBA Coach of the Month three times. He became the only Celtics coach since the award’s inception (1982-83) to win the award three times. He joined K.C. Jones, Jimmy Rodgers and Chris Ford as the only Celtics head coaches to have won the award. Before taking over the Celtics, Rivers spent just over four seasons as the head coach of the Orlando Magic, earning Coach of the Year Honors in his first season for leading a team that featured four undrafted starters to a 41-41 record. Rivers guided the Magic to three straight Playoff appearances from 2000-2003, and overall tallied a 171-168 (.506) record in Orlando before being released on November 17, 2003. Born on October 13, 1961, Rivers played 13 seasons in the NBA for the Atlanta Hawks (1983-84 to 1990-91), Clippers (1991-92), New York CLIPPERS EXECUTIVES Knicks (1992-93 to 1993-94) and San Antonio Spurs (1994 to 1995-96). He played for three of the game’s top coaches in Pat Riley, Larry Brown and Mike Fratello, and holds career averages of 10.9 points, 5.7 assists and 3.0 rebounds per game. His teams advanced to the NBA Playoffs 10 times, where he averaged 11.4 points, 5.9 assists and 3.3 rebounds. Rivers saw action in 864 regular season games and 81 playoff games over the course of his career. Rivers averaged a double-double in 1986-87 (12.8 points per game, 10.0 assists per game) and was selected to play in the 1988 NBA All-Star Game. He averaged a career-best 15.2 points per game in 1990-91 and scored a career-high 37 points against Seattle on February 4, 1988. He also shares an NBA single-game playoff record for most assists in one half (15 vs. Boston, May 16, 1988). Drafted after his junior season out of Marquette by the Atlanta Hawks in the second round (31st overall) of the 1983 NBA Draft, he played the first eight years of his career with Atlanta, setting the Hawks’ singleseason assists record with 823 in 1986-87 and ending his stint with the team as the franchise’s all-time assist leader with 3,866. A product of Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois, Rivers earned the nickname “Doc” from former Marquette coach Rick Majerus when he wore a “Dr. J” t-shirt to a summer basketball camp. Rivers played for the United States at the 1982 World Championship of Basketball, leading the U.S. to a silver medal and earning tournament MVP honors after averaging a team-best 18.6 points per game. During the summer of 2001, he served as an assistant coach for the USA Men’s Basketball Team at the Goodwill Games in Brisbane, Australia, that captured the Gold Medal. Rivers earned a pre-law/political science degree from Marquette in 1985 and was honored by the Pro Basketball Writers with the 1990 J. Walter Kennedy Basketball Citizenship Award. Following the 1999-2000 season, Rivers was named Male Coach-of-the-Year at the Rainbow Sports Awards, which reflect not only accomplishments in the sports industry, but also the grace, dignity, commitment and humanity each individual exemplifies. In June 2013, Rivers received the Sam Lacy Pioneer Award at the 2013 National Association of Black Journalists national convention. The award is given annually to sports figures based on their contributions to their respected careers and direct impact on the communities they served. He has long been active in the community, serving as a member of the All-Star Advisory Council for the Jr. NBA and Jr. WNBA youth basketball support program, offering instrumental guidance to the player, coach and parent training efforts for recreational youth basketball leagues across the country. Rivers participated in the 2015 Special Olympics World Games in Los Angeles, taking part in the Opening Ceremonies and assisting during the basketball events. Rivers is the nephew of former NBA player Jim Brewer, and the cousin of former NBA player Byron Irvin and Major League Baseball player Ken Singleton. Rivers and his wife, Kris, have four children: Jeremiah, Callie, Austin and Spencer. 45 | CLIPPERS GAMETIME MAGAZINE


2016 Los Angeles Clippers Gameday 1
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