018_Raiders16.p1

2016 Oakland Raiders Gameday 7

selected with the fourth-overall pick out of Alabama, had an immediate impact, setting franchise rookie records with 72 receptions for 1,070 yards and garnering PFWA All-Rookie and Pro Bowl honors. Defensive lineman Mario Edwards Jr., the Raiders’ second-round selection, also had a solid impact as a rookie, starting 10 games and earning All-Rookie recognition. McKenzie and his staff supplemented the roster with exceptional talent through the 2014 NFL Draft, adding four immediate starters to the active roster and earning top grades across the board from local and national media. The Raiders selected six defensive players, including fifth-overall selection Khalil Mack, who earned consensus All-Rookie honors in his first season. Mack blossomed into one of the league’s elite defenders in his second year, recording 15 sacks to rank second in the NFL and becoming the first player ever to be named first-team All-Pro at two different positions (defensive end and linebacker) in the same season. In the second round of the 2014 NFL Draft, McKenzie added quarterback Derek Carr, who started all 16 games as a rookie and shattered every rookie passing record in franchise annals. Carr continued his ascent in his sophomore season, garnering Pro Bowl honors after passing for 3,987 yards and tossing 32 touchdowns, the second highest single-season total in franchise history. The draft class bounty also included starting guard Gabe Jackson, defensive tackle Justin Ellis and defensive back TJ Carrie. Stocking the roster with talented young players began in earnest for McKenzie with the 2013 NFL Draft, when he traded the third-overall pick to Miami in exchange for the 12th selection and the Dolphins’ secondround choice, picks which he used to select cornerback DJ Hayden and tackle Menelik Watson, respectively. McKenzie later executed two additional draft-day trades, turning seven picks into a league-high 10 total selections, and mining promising talents in the later rounds like tight end Mychal Rivera and running back Latavius Murray, who earned a Pro Bowl nod in 2015. In his first draft as General Manager in 2012, the Raiders owned just five selections and none before the 95th overall pick, which was a third-round compensatory choice. Following that draft, McKenzie added rookie free agent wide receiver Rod Streater, who totaled 39 receptions as a newcomer and led the Raiders with 60 catches for 888 yards in 2013, and punter Marquette King, who led the NFL in punting (48.9 avg.) in 2013 and set a franchise record with 40 punts placed inside the 20-yard line in 2015. McKenzie, who played in 58 games with 40 starts at linebacker for the Silver and Black from 1985-88, re-joined the franchise after 18 years in the Green Bay Packers’ personnel department. He joined the Packers in 1994 and helped Green Bay capture eight division titles and three conference championships, and both Super Bowl XXXI and Super Bowl XLV. As a key component in evaluating and acquiring talent, McKenzie was instrumental in helping the Packers establish the NFL’s second-best record, 194-110 (.638), trailing only New England (198-106, .651) since the 1993 dawn of free agency and the salary cap, a period of time that many observers predicted would be difficult to navigate for the small-market franchise. In Green Bay, McKenzie oversaw the team’s scouting efforts of all professional football leagues, including the NFL, CFL and Arena Football League. He also played a key role in evaluating both players on the roster and potential free agents across the NFL. McKenzie was heavily involved in all of the team’s transactions and tryouts on a daily basis to build depth, including 2010, when the Packers won the Lombardi Trophy despite losing six opening-day starters – and 15 overall – to seasonending injuries. He was also central in signing free agents Ryan Pickett and Charles Woodson, the 2009 Defensive Player of the Year. His work helped produce several contributors in the run to the Super Bowl XLV title and a decade earlier, he helped obtain Eugene Robinson, Santana Dotson, Bruce Wilkerson, Andre Rison and Desmond Howard, who were significant contributors to the Packers’ Super Bowl XXXI title. During his last years with the Packers, which included the team’s world championship campaign in 2010 and its 15-1 regular season in 2011, McKenzie provided advance scouting reports on upcoming opponents for the head coach and his staff. He also contributed to the scouting of college prospects and worked with general manager Ted Thompson to prepare for the annual draft. The Packers promoted him to director– football operations in 2008. McKenzie, 53, was an NFL linebacker for seven seasons (1985-90, 1992) before entering the coaching ranks. He joined Green Bay in 1994 18 Gameday MAGAZINE as a pro personnel assistant, hired by former Raiders executive Ron Wolf, then the executive vice president/general manager of the Packers. Wolf met McKenzie, then a University of Tennessee graduate assistant coach, while in Knoxville to scout future Raider Charlie Garner. Wolf promoted McKenzie to director of pro personnel in May 1997, after Green Bay won Super Bowl XXXI. Selected by the Silver and Black as a 10th-round draft pick out of Tennessee in 1985, McKenzie excelled in his first year, earning All- Rookie Team honors as the Raiders went 12-4 and won the AFC West. He started all 32 games over his first two seasons at inside linebacker. After four years (1985-88) with the Raiders, McKenzie spent two seasons (1989-90) with the Phoenix Cardinals and one year with the San Francisco 49ers (1992). Prior to signing with the 49ers, McKenzie played with the Montreal Machine of the World League of American Football (WLAF) in the spring of 1992. While out of pro football in 1991, he spent a season as a defensive coach for Dorsey High School in Los Angeles, helping the program to a CIF Los Angeles Section championship. In 1993, McKenzie returned to Tennessee and served as a graduate assistant coach under Phillip Fulmer. That year, the Volunteers appeared in the Florida Citrus Bowl and landed one of the nation’s top recruiting classes, highlighted by quarterback Peyton Manning. While back in Knoxville, McKenzie also pursued a master’s degree in education administration. Born in Knoxville, Tenn., on Feb. 8, 1963, McKenzie earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration with an emphasis in personnel management at Tennessee. An all-state linebacker and a foursport letterman at Austin-East High School in Knoxville, McKenzie was valedictorian of his 1981 high school graduating class, despite throwing the shot and discus for his track team, playing baseball (first base) and basketball (forward), and starting on both sides of the line on the gridiron. His twin brother, Raleigh, who also attended Tennessee and enjoyed a 16-year NFL career with four teams before retiring in 2001, joined his brother in the Raiders’ personnel department as a college scout in 2012. The McKenzie twins have a total of four Super Bowl rings between them. McKenzie and his wife, June, have two daughters, Jasmin Dolores, a 2014 graduate of Wheaton College with a degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in urban education, and Mahkayla Mariah, a 2015 graduate of Duke University with a degree in civil engineering. He also has two sons, Reginald Kahlil, entering his sophomore year at Tennessee, and Jalen Elijah, entering his senior year at Clayton Valley Charter High School. Football Background YearS Team Position 1985-88 Los Angeles Raiders Linebacker 1989-90 Phoenix Cardinals Linebacker 1991 Dorsey H.S. (Los Angeles) Defensive Coach 1992 Montreal Machine (WLAF) Linebacker 1992 San Francisco 49ers Linebacker 1993 University of Tennessee Graduate Assistant/Defense 1994-96 Green Bay Packers Pro Personnel Assistant 1997-07 Green Bay Packers Director of Pro Personnel 2008-11 Green Bay Packers Director of Football Operations 2012-16 Oakland Raiders General Manager


2016 Oakland Raiders Gameday 7
To see the actual publication please follow the link above